Tuesday, July 8, 2014

Turmeric is Good for You, and Good for Dogs


Many people are unaware of the health benefits associated with turmeric (curcumin) for both humans and animals.

Turmeric is an inexpensive, natural supplement that can easily be added to a dogs diet, raw fed or not.

I began researching the use of turmeric for dogs about a year ago, after a friend suggested I look into it for Neeko's joint pain.

What is Turmeric?
If you have ever eaten Indian or Thai cuisine, you have probably had a dish with turmeric in it.  It is made by boiling the underground stem of a plant in the ginger family, then drying and grinding.  Curcumin is considered to be the active ingredient of turmeric.

Why use Turmeric?
Little research/clinical trials have been done regarding the benefits of turmeric for dogs.  However, many in vitro studies have been done that suggest it is highly beneficial to humans.

Some Benefits Include:
  • As a natural anti-inflammatory, it can bring relief to a dog (or person) suffering with joint pain.
  • There is research suggesting that it can prevent some types of cancers.  Source
  • It may be good for the brain, possibly helping to treat depression and prevent dementia.
How to use Turmeric
I sprinkle turmeric straight on the raw meals of my dogs, most every day.  Initially, there was some hesitation, but now they eat it up no problem.

turmeric raw dog food
It looks ready to be barbecued.
There are various opinions regarding the dosage of turmeric for dogs, or how much turmeric to give a dog.  I go by the 1/8 to 1/4 tsp per 10 lbs of body weight, so my dogs get a teaspoon or a bit more of turmeric per day.

Turmeric does not dissolve in water, but does dissolve in fat.  When I first started supplementing with it, it mixed easily with Grizzly Pollock or Salmon oil, and my dogs took it more willingly.

It can be sprinkled over the top of kibble, or mixed in easily with canned food.

If a dog will not eat powdered turmeric, supplements containing turmeric for dogs do exist.  I have not tried any of these, so I cannot speak to the efficacy, quality, or safety of them.
Turmeric can potentially cause constipation, so dogs should have clean, fresh water available at all times.

Additional Reading
Dogs Naturally Magazine
Healthy Pets with Dr. Karen Becker

13 comments:

  1. Well I never knew that! Just thought it was just a flavouring

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  2. Have you noticed a difference since you started using it?

    --Wags (and purrs) from Life with Dogs and Cats

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    1. I really have. Since starting it, my girl seems less stiff. I also give fish oil and an additional joint supplement to her.

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  3. I think I may have some leftover from my Thai experimental cooking days. It's probably 7years old. I'm guessing it has lost potency by now.

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  4. I have heard a lot about turmeric lately. :)

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  5. owhhh cool! I'm from Asia and fresh tumeric are everywhere. Should give it a try

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  6. Interesting! I would have never thought to put that on a dogs raw diet!
    ღ husky hugz ღ frum our pack at Love is being owned by a husky!

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  7. Our joint supplement has turmeric. It works.

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  8. Turmeric is really a miracle ingredient for both dogs and humans. It seems to cover lots of preventive and anti-inflammatory properties. However, there is one slight drawback that is often overlooked by pet parents, and that is constipation. However, there are still some other things that can cause constipation in dogs other than turmeric, and you can read them here: http://dogsaholic.com/care/constipation-in-dogs.html

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  9. Chicken - whole or backs, necks, wings etc. * Turkey - whole or necks, wings etc. * Cornish game hens * Beef - almost any. It is not recommended to give them femur bones or the like as they may be too hard and could possibly chip their teeth. * Oxtail * Rabbit * Pork - ribs, neck, feet etc *
    pet hair vacuum

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Thanks for the howls!!